"Becoming Hyphenated" by Roksana Filipowska

Added on by Lilly Hern-Fondation.

A colorful mass of dyed newsprint emerges from the cornice where the gallery wall meets the ceiling. It cascades down and spills onto the floor, as though to confront the viewer who draws near. Sculpted objects and painted canvases coexist inside the space, suggesting that this paper skin can embrace divergent media, colors, processes, and patterns. Transformed through the various mixed dyes and pooled paint that have seeped into it, the thick newsprint evokes a flowing river or silk fabric billowing in the wind—it telegraphs change.

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"endless rain, flora, honey, neo-nationalism" by Danni Shen

Added on by Lilly Hern-Fondation.

“在北太平洋制造一场梅雨” (zai bei tai ping yang zhi zao yi chang mei yu, or, when translated into English, making a stationary rain on the North Pacific Ocean) was the phrase that came to mind for Mo Kong as the artist embarked on a research trajectory addressing relationships between migration, ecology, land use, climate change, human rights, trade wars, censorship, and the geo-politics of neo-nationalism and colonialism. Set within a Cold War period prophesized for a proximate future, Making A Stationary Rain On The North Pacific Ocean composes a weather report on the human condition, ever in the making.

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"Hear Away Closer: Notes on Sonic Sensibility" by Tausif Noor

Added on by Lilly Hern-Fondation.

To harness this sonic resistance as a political project—one that defies the discursive constructions imposed by unjust systems of exclusion—is crucial and necessary. In amplifying the many muted, murmuring voices that will collectively reflect our possible futures, the artists demonstrate that sound carries a particular presence. This presence—beyond voice, beyond the body, and beyond legibility—is located within a complex amalgamation of sound and echo, and is left for the viewer to listen closely and register.

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"Dancer, Anchor, Stage" by Mira Dayal

Added on by Lilly Hern-Fondation.

Writings about the relationships between the news, politics, and art often repeat that art cannot possibly react to the news as quickly as the morning Times; that art cannot affect change or influence current events with the same efficacy as, say, street protests, elections, or nationally televised speeches. Godoy’s embodiment of the figure of the newscaster is not an attempt to make art as effective or responsive as the news per se. Rather, it is a method of slowing down the news, allowing it to tickle the spine, to disturb the mind, to be repeated, to be fragmented and reconstructed. Alternate stories emerge. Parallel lines are uncovered.

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"On Place: Physical, Imagined, Technological" by Amanda York

Added on by Lilly Hern-Fondation.

James Yakimicki’s paintings and drawings are fusions of landscapes omitting horizon lines, scale, and perspective in favor of aerial views and multiple vanishing points. His experiences living on the flat planes of central Indiana, the altitudinal heights of Boulder, Colorado, and the urban sprawl of New York City are incorporated into all of his works, which do not represent one place or event, but are conflations of many over time. Yakimicki introduces dreamlike elements into these environments, such as celestial formations or floating objects, and the result is alternately euphoric or nightmarish. Technology figures into his work as large mechanical assemblages, and his godlike vantage points allude to modern surveillance capabilities.

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