Filtering by: Workshops
Jul
26
6:00 PM18:00

Re/thinking Mentorship in the Arts for POC

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Re/thinking Mentorship in the Arts for POC
Friday, July 26, 2019
6:00pm-8:00pm
FREE

Re/thinking Mentorship in the Arts for POC is a panel discussion and workshop that centers the POC experience in navigating mentorship in the arts field. As arts organizations and institutions continue to address issues of racial, gender, and class disparities throughout the field, questions about the importance and practice of mentorship, specifically for the POC community, become increasingly critical. This panel discussion invites professionals across artistic disciplines to delve into the nuances of mentorship by exploring how it can uplift a person’s career, yet potentially present exploitative dynamics. Our panel and breakout conversations and will unpack the limitations of mentorship and consider other models of leadership and community building in the arts.

This panel will be moderated by Claire Kim and Danilo Machado in conversation with Angie Pittman, Kristina Newman-Scott, and Ximena Izquierdo Ugaz. This program is an intentional space for people of color in the arts. Reflections about the organizing process and panel conversation will be published for a broader audience.

Claire Kim is an independent curator based in New York City. She is a recent graduate of Fordham University, where she studied English Literature and Art History. Kim has worked in curation, museum education, and programming with numerous arts institutions and organizations, including the New Museum, the Asian American Arts Alliance, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, MoCADA and BRIC.

Danilo Machado is a queer undocumented poet and curator born in Medellín, Colombia and currently living in Brooklyn, New York. His poetry and criticism have been featured in Hyperallergic, The Brooklyn Rail, Bushwick Daily, ArtCritical, and the Connecticut Review, among other publications. An honors graduate of the University of Connecticut and former fellow at the Brooklyn Museum, Danilo is currently curating his first exhibition, Otherwise Obscured: Erasure in Body and Text, on view at Franklin Street Works in Stamford, Connecticut from September 21, 2019 to January 26, 2020.

Angie Pittman is a New York based Bessie award-winning dance artist, dance maker, and dance educator. Her work has been performed at The Kitchen, Gibney Dance (Invocation, Proclamation, Manifesto), BAAD! (BlaktinX Performance Series), Movement Research at Judson Church, Triskelion Arts, STooPS, The Domestic Performance Agency, The KnockDown Center (Sunday Service), The Invisible Dog (Catch 73), Danspace Project (Food for Thought, Draftworks, Platform 2018, Shared Evening of Dance 2019), and Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (Illinois). Angie is currently working as a collaborator and dance artist with Anna Sperber, Antonio Ramos, Stephanie Acosta, devynn emory/beast productions, and Donna Uchizono Company. Angie has had the pleasure of dancing in works by Ralph Lemon, Tere O'Connor, Jennifer Monson, Kim Brandt, Tess Dworman, Jasmine Hearn, Jonathan Gonzalez, and many others. She holds an MFA in Dance and Choreography from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with a graduate minor in African American Studies. Her work has been supported by Foundation for Contemporary Arts Emergency Grant and residencies through Tofte Lake Center and Movement Research. Angie’s work resides in a space that investigates how her body moves through ballad, groove, sparkle, spirit, spirituals, ancestry, vulnerability, and power.

Kristina Newman-Scott is the newly appointed President of BRIC, the leading presenter of free cultural programming in Brooklyn and a major incubator and supporter of Brooklyn artists and media-makers. She is the first immigrant and first woman of color to serve in this position. Previously, Newman-Scott served as the Director of Culture and State Historic Preservation Officer for the State of Connecticut; Director of Marketing, Events and Cultural Affairs for the City of Hartford; Director of Programs at the Boston Center for the Arts; and Director of Visual Arts at Hartford's Real Art Ways. In June 2018, Americans for the Arts presented Kristina with the Selina Roberts Ottum Award, which recognizes an individual working in arts management who exemplifies extraordinary leadership qualities. Kristina describes herself as a Jamaican-raised cultural strategist, connecting minds to a vision and hands to a purpose of meaningful existence. She currently resides in Brooklyn with her husband and two children.

Ximena Izquierdo Ugaz is a multimedia artist, curator, and educator born in Lima, Perú. Her work primarily touches on the imprint of inter-generational trauma within her own family in relationship to place and migration. She is the Teen Programs Coordinator at the Brooklyn Museum and the visual arts co-curator at Nat. Brut. In addition, Izquierdo Ugaz is the author of the self-published Standing in the Bathroom in the Dark Thinking About Green and El Mismo Pozo/The Same Well. Her work has appeared in FEELINGS and her first chapbook is titled Estoy Tristeza (No, Dear Magazine & Small Anchor Press, 2018).

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Relevant Content II: A panel presentation and discussion on design
Mar
23
2:00 PM14:00

Relevant Content II: A panel presentation and discussion on design

Relevant Content is a series of workshops for artists, curators, and designers that challenges participants’ understanding of the role of design in the development of artistic narrative. For the second event in the Relevant Content series, Joshua Hauth, Eva Bochem-Shur, Erik Freer, and Simon Wu will meet to discuss spatial and contextual thinking, documentation and editing, professional presentation, and the convergence of design and artistic practices.

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Get Paid: Wage and Benefits Negotiation for Cultural Workers
Feb
16
2:00 PM14:00

Get Paid: Wage and Benefits Negotiation for Cultural Workers

Are you tired of feeling underpaid and undervalued? Ready to ask for a raise but not sure how? Looking for other ways to avoid burnout? This workshop will discuss steps to take toward thriving and give participants time and space to reflect on their current situation and strategize an approach that works for their context.

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Again...The Lumpen-Headache
Dec
15
2:30 PM14:30

Again...The Lumpen-Headache

Participants in “Again…The Lumpen Headache” will be enlisted in the analysis and co-recreation of a set of meetings that marked the end of the art journal The Fox along with the New York section of the artist collective Art & Language in 1976, taking part in the conversations as one of the interlocutors and actively contributing towards the staging of a group reading.

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Relevant Content: A workshop on design thinking for artists + curators
Nov
3
3:00 PM15:00

Relevant Content: A workshop on design thinking for artists + curators

Relevant Content is a free workshop for artists and curators that challenges participants’ understanding of the role of design in the development of artistic narrative. From individual to institutional levels of engagement, we will examine how design works in an art context by looking at individual artworks, website and catalogue production, and exhibition design.

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Sep
26
6:00 PM18:00

Righteous Rage: Using Anger as a Tool to Fuel Equity in Arts Management

During this workshop, Monica Montgomery and Janelle Naomi Rouse will explore a variety of strategies to fuel our contentious feelings around arts administration, to cultivate empathy, advocate action, and speak out against pervasive narratives of injustice in the cultural institutions we work in and around.

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Jan
24
6:30 PM18:30

Access/Points Part 2 - Access/Points Roundtable: Disability Arts

Join us for a public convening and discussion at CUE. The roundtable will bring together artists and representatives from various art and social service organizations to share approaches to building institutions that serve disabled audiences and artists who are often excluded from mainstream art resources.

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Access/Points Part 1 - Let's Keep in Touch Youth Workshop
Nov
12
12:30 PM12:30

Access/Points Part 1 - Let's Keep in Touch Youth Workshop

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Access/Points: Approaches to Disability Arts
Part 1: Let's Keep in Touch Youth Workshop
Sunday, November 12th, 2017, 12:30-3:30pm
Venue: Queens Museum

Let’s Keep in Touch (LKiT) is a multifaceted collaborative project which investigates tactility in the context of art via community dialogue, embodied learning, and the development of new critical practices and methodologies. Produced by Carmen Papalia and Whitney Mashburn in 2016, the project aims to set a precedent for tactile engagement and haptic criticism to become viable practices within contemporary art.

Offering a perspective that is traditionally underrepresented in art scholarship, youth participants are at the center of knowledge production in this iteration of LKiT.  This November, artist Carmen Papalia and curator Whitney Mashburn will lead a series of workshops with students at various schools in New York City.  Together with the youth, they will explore the topics of social accessibility and haptic criticism in relation to a collection of student-chosen belongings that hold significance to those involved. Considering non-visual and embodied approaches to learning, the group will assess the collection for tactile taxonomy and vocabulary while employing the critical methodology that Georgina Kleege, Lecturer in English at the University of California at Berkeley and author of  “Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller” (2006) and “Sight Unseen” (1999) - describes in her writings on tactility and museology.

The insights from this collaboration will culminate in a public presentation curated by Mashburn at the CUE Foundation in February 2018; in which objects used in the workshops will be on display alongside process documentation and youth-authored interpretation.


Carmen Papalia makes participatory, socially engaged projects on the topic of access as it relates to public space, the art institution and visual culture. In early 2015, Papalia served as Artist-in-Residence at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, UK and at the Model Contemporary Art Centre, Sligo, Ireland, where he assumed the role of Access Coordinator, making site specific interventions in response to the long history of disabling practices at each institution.

Whitney Mashburn is a Boston-based curator, currently collaborating on a project with Vancouver-based social practice artist, Carmen Papalia. She holds an M.A. in Critical and Curatorial Studies from the University of Louisville’s Hite Art Institute, an M.A. in Disability Studies and Counselor Education, and a B.A. in History of Art and Studio Art from Vanderbilt University. She has interned at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts as a curatorial research assistant, is a nationally certified rehabilitation counselor (CRC), and has worked both in disability services offices and as a researcher and editor in art history in Vanderbilt’s Special Collections and Archives and in their History of Art department. Her current research investigates tactile aesthetics, accessibility, and the role of conversation in social practice and institutional critique.


Access/Points: Approaches to Disability Arts is a series of conversations, workshops, and artist projects that explores ability as the crux of radical inclusion and access in the arts and beyond. The series investigates the ways that artists, cultural producers, and institutions are redefining disability and accessibility in contemporary art by destabilizing our notions of neutral public spaces and arts organizations, and moving towards inclusive body politics and social infrastructures.

Organized by CUE's 2017 Public Programming Fellow, Jeff Kasper, in partnership with Social Practice Queens at Queens College CUNY.

Supported by the Queens Museum and Social Practice Queens at Queens College CUNY.

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Strange Attractors: Opening Presentations
Nov
4
3:00 PM15:00

Strange Attractors: Opening Presentations

This is the opening event of Strange Attractors: Art, Science, and the Question of Convergence, a multi-format symposium. This event features presentations by art historian, James Elkins of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Elaine Reynolds, associate professor of biology and neuroscience at Lafayette College; and artist Matthew Ritchie. Refreshments will be served.

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Artist/Admin: Collaboration
Jun
27
6:30 PM18:30

Artist/Admin: Collaboration

This group discussion about collaboration will address how art and cultural institutions can mediate the perception of competition and work together towards a more equitable distribution of resources. 

This session of Artist/Admin is co-facilitated by Lisa Hoffman, Katherine Tom, and Kira Simon-Kennedy.

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Against Monoculture: Meg Onli on “Poetics and Politics”
May
5
4:00 PM16:00

Against Monoculture: Meg Onli on “Poetics and Politics”

A lecture series on artists, institutions, and practicing exits to business as usual

Against Monoculture is a multi-part lecture series organized by CUE Art Foundation and Purchase College’s MFA Visual Arts Program. Conceived as a lecture series in residence, Against Monoculture connects multiple partners, artists, and art organizations in an effort to rethink how institutions should thrive in era of debt and crisis.

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Against Monoculture: Sarah Ross on “Working Through A Wall”
Apr
28
4:00 PM16:00

Against Monoculture: Sarah Ross on “Working Through A Wall”

A lecture series on artists, institutions, and practicing exits to business as usual

Against Monoculture is a multi-part lecture series organized by CUE Art Foundation and Purchase College’s MFA Visual Arts Program. Conceived as a lecture series in residence, Against Monoculture connects multiple partners, artists, and art organizations in an effort to rethink how institutions should thrive in era of debt and crisis.

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